Assessing the post-harvest constraints in smallholders’ groundnut production: A Survey in central Malawi

Tsusaka, T W and Msere, H W and Gondwe, L and Madzonga, O and Clarke, S and Siambi, M and Okori, P (2016) Assessing the post-harvest constraints in smallholders’ groundnut production: A Survey in central Malawi. Agricultural Science Research Journal, 06 (09). pp. 213-226. ISSN 2026 –6073

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Abstract

An in-depth scoping survey was conducted on 248 smallholder farmers producing groundnut in Malawi to delineate the constraints in production, especially on-farm post-harvest operations, while revealing various aspects in the status of production and consumption practices. The insightful outcomes included the farmers’ perception of the post-harvest operations as highly labor demanding, being the major obstacle to production expansion for the lucrative and nutritious crop. In particular, shelling, lifting, and stripping were the top three processes of remarkable labor intensity. The respondents expressed the intention for scale-up as long as the labor constraints were mitigated, with expected welfare gain through increased income, improved nutrition, and reduced aflatoxin contamination, as well as mitigated drudgery for women.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: RP-Market Institutions and Policies
CRP: CGIAR Research Program on Grain Legumes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Mechanization, Equipment, Labor, Groundnut, Gender, Food safety, Aflatoxin
Subjects: Mandate crops > Groundnut
Depositing User: Mr Ramesh K
Date Deposited: 19 Sep 2016 04:11
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2016 07:36
URI: http://oar.icrisat.org/id/eprint/9679
Official URL: http://resjournals.com/journals/agricultural-scien...
Projects: UNSPECIFIED
Funders: UNSPECIFIED
Acknowledgement: The authors cordially thank the McKnight Foundation for funding the survey through the Southern Africa Community of Practice under the Collaborative Crop Research Program. Plan Malawi and the government extension staff provided support for field work.
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