Quantifying potential benefits of drought and heat tolerance in rainy season sorghum for adapting to climate change

Singh, P and Nedumaran, S and Traore, P C S and Boote, K J and Rattunde, H F W and Prasad, P V V and Singh, N P and Srinivas, K and Bantilan, M C S (2014) Quantifying potential benefits of drought and heat tolerance in rainy season sorghum for adapting to climate change. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 185. pp. 37-48. ISSN 0168-1923

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Abstract

Maintaining high levels of productivity under climate change will require developing cultivars that are able to perform under varying drought and heat stresses and with maturities that match water availability. The CSM-CERES-Sorghum model was used to quantify the potential benefits of altering crop life cycle, enhancing yield potential traits, and incorporating drought and heat tolerance in the commonly grown cultivar types at two sites each in India (cv. CSV 15 at both Akola and Indore) and Mali (cv. CSM 335 at Samanko and cv. CSM 63E at Cinzana), West Africa. Under current climate CSV 15 on average matured in 108 days and produced 3790 kg ha−1 grain yield at Akola; whereas at Indore it matured in 115 days and produced 3540 kg ha−1 grain yield. Similarly under current climate, CSM 335 matured in 120 days and produced 2700 kg ha−1 grain yield at Samanko; whereas CSM 63E matured in 85 days at Cinzana and produced 2210 kg ha−1 grain yield. Decreasing crop life cycle duration of cultivars by 10% decreased yields at all the sites under both current and future climates. In contrast, increasing crop life cycle by 10% increased yields up to 12% at Akola, 9% at Indore, 8% at Samanko and 33% at Cinzana. Enhancing yield potential traits (radiation use efficiency, relative leaf size and partitioning of assimilates to the panicle each increased by 10%) in the longer cycle cultivars increased the yields by 11–18% at Akola, 17–19% at Indore, 10–12% at Samanko and 14–25% at Cinzana under current and future climates of the sites. Except for the Samanko site, yield gains were larger by incorporating drought tolerance than heat tolerance under the current climate. However, under future climates yield gains were higher by incorporating heat tolerance at Akola, Samanko and Cinzana, but not at Indore. Net benefits of incorporating both drought and heat tolerance increased yield up to 17% at Akola, 9% at Indore, 7% at Samanko and 16% at Cinzana under climate change. It is concluded that different combinations of traits will be needed to increase and sustain productivity of sorghum in current and future climates at these target sites and that the CSM-CERES-Sorghum model can be used to quantify benefits of incorporating certain traits.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: RP-Dryland Cereals
RP-Market Institutions and Policies
CRPS: CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security
CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Cereals
CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets
Uncontrolled Keywords: Genetic adaptation; Plant traits; Crop modeling; Sorghum model; Climate change factors
Subjects: Mandate crops > Sorghum
Depositing User: Mr Sanat Kumar Behera
Date Deposited: 04 Dec 2013 05:07
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2016 08:35
URI: http://oar.icrisat.org/id/eprint/7272
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2013.10.012
Projects: CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions and Markets, CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agricultural and Food Security (CCAFS) and Dryland Cereals., CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Cereals
Funders: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Acknowledgement: This work was supported in part by the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions and Markets, The Global Futures Project funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agricultural and Food Security (CCAFS) and Dryland Cereals.
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