Socio-economic Assessment of Legume Production, Farmer Technology Choice,Market Linkages, Institutions and Poverty in Rural Ethiopia: Institutions, Markets, Policy and Impacts Research Report No. 3

Asfaw, S and Shiferaw, B and Simtowe, F and Muricho, G and Abate, T and Ferede, S (2010) Socio-economic Assessment of Legume Production, Farmer Technology Choice,Market Linkages, Institutions and Poverty in Rural Ethiopia: Institutions, Markets, Policy and Impacts Research Report No. 3. Monograph. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics , Nairobi, Kenya.

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This study was conducted as part of a series of country-specifi c baseline assessments to provide a broad overview of the production, market and socioeconomic conditions, constraints and opportunities in the farming systems targeted for improving the productivity and market access for legumes in selected countries. In Ethiopia, the main legume of interest is chickpea and much of the effort in this assessment revolves around this crop while also providing the broad picture about other crops and livelihood strategies. The main users of this information are expected to be legume project scientists, planners, development agencies and decision makers interested in the legume subsectors in Ethiopia in particular and in Eastern and Southern Africa in general. We would particularly like to thank the Debre Zeit Agricultural Research Center (DZARC) of the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) for providing leadership in implementing baseline household surveys. We would particularly like to recognize the contribution of Dr Kebebew Assefa, the project leader at the time of the survey in Ethiopia. We also would like to thank partners from the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, especially those located in the three surveyed districts of Gimbichu, Minjar-Shenkora and Lume-Ejere for their support in the design and implementation of the surveys. The study was fi nancially supported by the Tropical Legumes II and Treasure Legumes projects operating in Ethiopia

Abstract

Today, about 1.1 billion people continue to live in extreme poverty on less than US$1 a day. Another 1.6 billion live on between US$1–2 per day. Three out of four poor people in developing countries lived in rural areas in 2002 (WDR 2008). Most depend on agriculture for their livelihoods, directly or indirectly. In much of sub-Saharan Africa, agriculture offers a promising opportunity for spurring growth, overcoming poverty, and enhancing food security. Of the total population of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003, 66% lived in rural areas. More than 90% of rural people in these regions depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. Ryan and Spencer (2001) estimated that three-quarters of the 1.3 billion people living below the poverty line in developing countries lived in rural areas. Of these, an estimated 66% relied on marginal lands (TAC 1997). Broad-based agricultural development through improving the productivity, profi tability and sustainability of smallholder farming is the main pathway out of poverty for millions of poor farm households. Agricultural productivity growth is also vital for stimulating growth in other sectors of the economy. But accelerated growth requires a sharp productivity increase in smallholder farming combined with more effective support to the millions coping as subsistence farmers, many of them in marginal areas. Gallup and Sachs (2000) estimated that, in comparison to temperate regions, productivity was 27% lower in the humid tropics and 42% lower in the dry tropics.

Item Type: Monograph (Monograph)
Divisions: UNSPECIFIED
CRPS: UNSPECIFIED
Subjects: Others > Food legumes
Others > Agriculture-Farming, Production, Technology, Economics
Depositing User: Mr Charan Sai Ch
Date Deposited: 06 Dec 2011 13:14
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2011 13:14
URI: http://oar.icrisat.org/id/eprint/3266
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